Australian

Australian competition watchdog warns Google, Facebook laws are just the start

By Jane Wardell



a sign on the side of a building: FILE PHOTO: A sign is pictured outs a Google offcie near the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California


© Reuters/Reuters Staff
FILE PHOTO: A sign is pictured outs a Google offcie near the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, California

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia’s competition regulator has warned that planned laws to make the country the first in the world to force Google and Facebook to pay for news content were likely just the start of more regulation for digital platforms.

The Australian government announced legislation last month after an investigation it said showed the tech giants held too much market power in the media industry, a situation it said posed a potential threat to a well-functioning democracy.

Under the code, Google and Facebook will be subject to mandatory price arbitration if a commercial agreement on payment for Australian media cannot be reached.



a man standing in front of a computer: FILE PHOTO: Attendees walk past a Facebook logo during Facebook Inc's F8 developers conference in San Jose


© Reuters/STEPHEN LAM
FILE PHOTO: Attendees walk past a Facebook logo during Facebook Inc’s F8 developers conference in San Jose

“This bargaining code

Australian opposition watchdog warns Google, Fb guidelines are just the commence

By Jane Wardell



a sign on the side of a building: FILE PHOTO: A sign is pictured outs a Google offcie near the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California


© Reuters/Reuters Employees
FILE Image: A indication is pictured outs a Google offcie close to the firm’s headquarters in Mountain View, California

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia’s levels of competition regulator has warned that prepared legislation to make the region the very first in the planet to pressure Google and Facebook to spend for information written content have been most likely just the get started of extra regulation for digital platforms.

The Australian govt introduced legislation previous thirty day period right after an investigation it explained showed the tech giants held also significantly sector energy in the media field, a situation it said posed a possible threat to a effectively-functioning democracy.

Beneath the code, Google and Facebook will be subject to required cost arbitration if a industrial settlement on payment for Australian media cannot be achieved.



a man standing in front of a computer: FILE PHOTO: Attendees walk past a Facebook logo during Facebook Inc's F8 developers conference in San Jose


© Reuters/STEPHEN LAM
FILE Photograph: Attendees walk past a Fb symbol for

Australian regulator rejects Google’s enterprise more than Fitbit opposition fears

FILE Photograph: The logo of Google is seen on a constructing at la Protection enterprise and economic district in Courbevoie close to Paris, France, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

(Reuters) – Australia’s antitrust regulator on Tuesday rejected an endeavor by Alphabet Inc-owned Google that sought to tackle competitiveness concerns around its prepared $2.1 billion acquisition of health and fitness tracker maker Fitbit.

The development arrives as Google continues to be at loggerheads with the Australian government around a quantity of concerns, including proposed legislation that will make Australia the initially nation in the earth to power Google and Facebook to shell out for news sourced from neighborhood media retailers.

In June, the Australian Competitors and Shopper Fee (ACCC) voiced considerations in excess of the Fitbit deal, warning Google’s acquisition would give it too much of people’s details, probably hurting opposition in wellness and on the internet promoting marketplaces.

Google had

Australian PM says China coal ban would breach WTO rules

CANBERRA, Australia — Australia’s prime minister said Tuesday that China would be violating World Trade Organization rules and a bilateral free trade agreement if it banned Australian coal.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison was replying to a report in China’s state-owned Global Times newspaper that said Beijing’s main planning agency had given power plants approval to import coal without restrictions, except for Australian coal.

Morrison said he was treating the report as “media speculation” because the Chinese government had yet to clarify its position.

“If that were the case, then that would obviously be in breach of WTO rules,” Morrison told reporters. “It would be obviously in breach of our free trade agreement and so we would hope that’s certainly not the case.”

China has targeted various Australian exports as relations with the country have deteriorated after Australia called for an independent inquiry into the coronavirus pandemic.

Asked about the report,